Dunstanburgh Castle

Dunstanburgh Castle in the cool blue of a sunrise.
Dunstanburgh Castle in the cool blue of a sunrise.
 Craster to Dunstanburgh Castle

…(or better still, carry on walking and have a pint in The Ship at Newton by the Sea).

If you are expecting a picture-perfect postcard village, Craster might be a disappointment because it isn’t that picturesque: no architecture of note, the only place to park (unless you’ve been allocated a slot with your holiday let) is the car park on the road approaching the village, and there’s nowt much to do on a day trip other than breath the salty air and sniff Mr. Robson’s kippers.

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Robson’s Kippers, Craster. Bet you didn’t know Laura Robson had a kipper factory, did ya? She’s more than just a dodgy serve…
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Craster Harbour

However, to state all of this is to wilfully miss the point: Craster isn’t so much an ending as a beginning, for the beauty is in the location.

Get out of bed fifteen minutes before the sun pops out of the toaster and you can be watching Dunstanburgh Castle bathe in the first glory of day, with only sheep and cows for company (why not rise 15 minutes earlier still and have a chat with the lobster men on your way?).

Dunstanburgh Castle, basking in the glory of sunrise light.
Dunstanburgh Castle, basking in the glory of sunrise light.

Keep walking north up the coast and, depending on the time of year, you can be at the Ship Inn in Newton by the Sea for brunch or lunch.

At the other end of the day, when the setting sun leaves behind a crystal clear sky, head for the benches on the harbour walls and watch twinkling stars perform before an obliging curtain of darkness (just don’t fall off the harbour edge).

So. I suppose the reason Craster doesn’t have tea rooms and other ways for folk to idly pass their day is because it doesn’t need any – here, nature provides its own riches and Craster merely nestles amongst them.

Newton by the Sea
Newton by the Sea